Category Archives: Whole Food

Nothing Better than Soup on a Cold Night

There is nothing better than a nice bowl of hot soup on a cold night. Here is an easy to make recipe for hamburger soup:DSC02160

1lb ground beef, browned with 1 minced onion
3 large carrots, peeled and sliced
3 large potatoes, peeled and cubed
1/2  bag frozen vegetables
1 cup beef stock
1 Tbsp sea salt
1 or 2 cloves fresh garlic, pressed

Put all ingredients in a pot and cover with water and cook on medium until all vegetables are soft enough to poke through with a fork.

DSC02166This goes really well with garlic cheese biscuits. Use your favorite drop biscuit recipe and add 1/2 cup of grated cheese and 1/2 tsp garlic powder. drop onto a buttered cookie sheet and bake at 400 degrees for about 10 minutes, or until golden brown on the edges. YUM!

A Thanksgiving Feast

2 Turkeys, one injected with teriyaki sauce and lemon juice and deep fried (Man Style), and the other roasted with butter, garlic, and rosemary

1 Ham

Traditional Stuffing

Rice Stuffing

Mashed Potatoes and Gravy

Sweet Potatoes

Green Bean Casserole

Broccoli Casserole

Little Smokies in BBQ Sauce

Green Goop (green jello powder mixed with cool whip, cottage cheese, and canned pineapple and oranges)

Yellow Jello (lemon jello with cream cheese and fruit)

12 Pies: 3 pumpkin, 1 chocolate pecan, 1 pecan, 1 apple, 1 peach, 2 lemon meringue, 1 banana creme, 1 chocolate creme, 1 coconut creme (This doesn’t count the pies that Denise brought that never got taken out.)

Sparkling Cider (4 gallons of cider and 2 lbs of dry ice)

11 adults, and 21 kids

Need an Idea for Creepy Halloween Treats?

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Try this yummy little treat for a scary Halloween feast . . . They are guaranteed to take a prize as the creepiest dish, but only make them if you don’t mind that no one will eat them. You can make severed lady fingers with sausage links, cheap fake fingernails, and ketchup.

To make these, first fry up your sausages, and trim a little off of the end of each sausage for that authentic severed look, then insert fingernails into the uncut end of each sausage and drizzle the cut ends with ketchup. Disgusting!

Apple Picking Time

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We have a whole tree of delicious, although somewhat bug infested apples. Most of them are good, but pray before you take a bite . . . or just cut them up first.

Today, between conference sessions, we went out and picked up the windfall apples, and we also picked about three bushels to make applesauce. Nothing like a good day of hard work to bring the family together!

Making Applesauce

Applesauce is easy to make, and if your kids are anything like mine, they suck it down like locusts in a cornfield! (ok, that may be an exaggeration, but it seems like it sometimes!) So, it was a real blessing to have the apples come on so well this year. It is like getting a free bonus and I don’t even have to go to the grocery store!

If you have never made applesauce, you should give it a try sometime. All you have to do is get a bunch of nice sweet apples — not the tart type like granny smith apples, but sweet ones like a gala or a golden delicious. Then you peel, core, and chop the apples, throw them in a pot, rinse them, and then cover them with water and cook them until they are soft enough to mash with the fork, but don’t over cook! If they look like applesauce before you run them 

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through the food processor, then you have cooked them too long. Once they are cooked, drain out the water and blend them in the blender or with a food processor until they are applesauce. If you use a good sweet apple, you don’t need to add any sweetener.

Once you have the applesauce, if you made a really big batch, you just fill your bottles, put on the lids, and heat for about 15 to 20 minutes in a hot water bath. Then take them out and let them cool so you can put them in your pantry where the kids will then find them and slurp them down before you can say “HEY!”

Pie

My oldest at the age of 14 has decided that she really likes to cook. It’s been great! This week she called me at work and asked “what’s Gram’s Pie?”

“Why?”  I ask.

“Well, I just found this recipe card and it says gram’s pie.”

“Oh – that is your great grandma’s pie recipe.”

“Your grandma?”

“No, your dad’s. Why?”

“Can I make it?”

Now I am thinking Grandma Sandage, the legendary pie maker who no one dares to make a pie since she died because it always brings on these irritating comparison sprees, where the pie is analyzed from all possible directions and never ends up being as good as grandma’s, so that the “how is it?” question is always met with “it tastes OK, but . . . “

“What kind of pie do you want to make?” I say.

“well there are all those peaches downstairs that need to be used.”

I had forgotten about those and thought she was going to suggest using canned fruit which never really turns out that good, so I am surprised again. and then I think, Why not let her try?

“OK, go for it.”

“Really?” she is in shock.

“Yeah, just don’t make a mess.” I imagined the house covered in flour and mashed up peaches.

She paused and then asked.  “Will you pick up some ice cream on your way home?”

How could I say no to that?

When I got home, the house was not a wreck as I imagined, but instead, there was a beautiful pie sitting on the oven. WOW! the edges of the crust were a bit dark, but I had forgotten to tell her to put foil over the edges of the crust while it was baking. The crust was flaky and the filling was divine.

The next day she made two, using up the rest of the peaches and she picked some apples off of the tree in the back yard for the second pie. This time she used foil on the edges of the crust.

“Your going to make me really fat,” I say as I bite into a piece of hot peach pie.

The legand lives on . . .

Fork Attack

So we are sitting there peacefully eating dinner, and Bee decides that she doesn’t want to eat her chicken. No big surprise there. The next thing I know Zee snatches the chicken off her plate, she starts screaming like a banshee and she stabs him in the face with her fork. While everyone sat with their mouths hanging open in shock I jumped up and grabbed the hand Zee was using to cover his face and pulled it away  — I was really afraid that she had forked him in the eye — but no, there on his forehead was a nice neat little row of pindrops of blood. A fork mark. This is one girl you really don’t want to cross.

French Toast

6 Eggs
2 Tbsp Condensed Milk
1 tsp Cinnamon
Whole Wheat Bread

Beat eggs, mix condensed milk with cinnamon and whisk into eggs until mixed evenly. Dip bread in egg mixture and fry in pan on medium heat with butter, being careful not to burn the butter. Top with your choice of fruit, butter and honey,  or syrup.

For stuffed French toast, beat 8oz cream cheese, and ¼ to ½ c of your choice of fruit. Using thin sliced bread, spread 1 slice of bread with filling, place two slices of bread together, and dip in egg mixture. Fry in butter and top with powdered sugar or fruit.

Molasses Cookies 

Last night I was really craving molasses cookies . . .These are soooo good!

1 ½  c Butter
1 c Sugar
½  c Molasses
1 c Brown Sugar
2 Eggs
1 tsp Cinnamon
½  tsp Cloves
½ tsp Sea Salt
½ tsp Ginger
1 Tbsp + 1 tsp Baking Soda
4¼ c Whole Wheat Pastry Flour

Cream together butter, sugar, molasses, and eggs.  Mix flour, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, cloves, and ginger.  For high altitudes, add another ¼ cup of flour. Combine all ingredients until well mixed.  Refrigerate 1 – 2 hours.  Roll into 1” balls, and place on a greased baking sheet.  Bake at 400° for 8 – 10 minutes until edges are set.  Remove to wire racks to cool.  Optional: Dip half of each cookie in melted white chocolate and set to dry on waxed paper.

Anji’s Chocolate Chip Cookies

Some days you just need a cookie! I try to make them as healthy as possible without sacrificing the soft chewy cookie taste . . .

Cookie Base
1 c Butter
½ c White Sugar
¾ c Brown Sugar (or substitute 1c organic Sucanat sugar for both brown and white sugars)
1 Egg
1 tsp Sea Salt
2 tsp Baking Soda
2 tsp Vanilla
2 c Flour (add an extra ¼ c flour for high altitudes – I like to use spelt flour or whole wheat pastry flour)

add:
1 c Chocolate Chips
½ c Oatmeal (I like to use Bob’s Red Mill 5 Grain cereal)
½ c Chopped Pecans
Mix butter, sugar, and egg. Add salt, baking soda, and vanilla. Mix well. Mix in flour until mixed evenly. Stir in chips, oatmeal, and nuts. For other variations, try adding other things to the cookie base recipe—for example, white chocolate chips, dried blueberries, and chopped pecans. Be creative! Drop in spoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet and bake for @ 8 to 10 min at 350°. (Do not overcook!)

Variations:

Fred’s Special Cap’n Crunch Cookies: add 1 c Captain Crunch Berries cereal and ½ c of chocolate chips
Oatmeal:
add 1 egg, 1 c oatmeal, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp nutmeg, and ½ c chopped nuts
Peanut Butter: add 1 c flour, 1 egg, and 1 c peanut butter
Carrot: add 1 c grated carrots, ½ c crushed pineapple and ½ c chopped nuts
Mocha Chunk: add ½ c flour, 1/3 c cocoa powder, 2 tsp coffee crystals dissolved into 2 tsp coffee liquor, and 2 c chopped semi sweet chocolate bars. Omit vanilla.
Ginger Snaps: add 1 tsp ground ginger, ¼ tsp cloves, and ¼ c molasses. Omit vanilla, ¼ c sugar, and ½ c butter.
Pumpkin: add 1 c pumpkin, ½ tsp nutmeg, and 1 tsp cinnamon. Optional: add 1 c chocolate chips. Omit ½ c butter.
Thumbprint: Add 1 egg. Omit sugar and ¼ c of brown sugar. Roll in 2 c chopped nuts. (Indent and fill with jam after baking.)
Chocolate Thumbprint: add 1½ c flour and ½ c cocoa powder. Roll into balls and roll in 2 c chopped nuts. Press indentation and fill with filling: heat 1/3 c corn syrup and add 1½ c chocolate chips. (Fill before baking)

Some of these variations are still as of yet untested. So, try them and then leave a comment on how they turned out. have fun!